Harding Street, Surrey Hills VIC 3127

Welcome to Harding Street Reserve

Harding Street Reserve is situated in Harding Street, Surrey Hills. This is on the south side of Canterbury Road between Warrigal and Elgar Roads.

The reserve forms part of the City of Whitehorse and consists of a lookout to the city, a steep embankment with bushes and trees and a big grassed area where "backyard" cricket and footy are played. There is a local playground, sealed paths wind through the space and the Bluebell Hill Tennis Club is located in the south east corner of the reserve.

The reserve is well utilised by local families and a special place for those who live in the area.

Working Bees

Working bees are usually held four times a year, and nearly always on a Saturday afternoon. We target specific areas that need addressing such as weeding, planting, pruning and general maintenance of the bushes and gardens. During the working bees any issues for Council to address are highlighted for their attention.

We meet at the lookout and sign the register at around 2 pm. We work for an hour or two, depending on the volume of work and the number of volunteers. The register is kept for Council and insurance purposes. The working bees are attended only by volunteers. Once our work is done, we stay around for a chat and a quick cuppa.

At the beginning of each year the dates for the working bees are set and sent to all the volunteers. Every now and then dates and times may be adjusted, usually because of inclement weather.

February 25th
May 20th
August 19th
November 25th

About

The park is situated on one of the highest points within the 12 kilometre radius of Melbourne, and has long been a site for people wanting to view the sunset over Melbourne or families watching spectacular fireworks displays over the city.

The land originally belonged to John White who migrated to Victoria in 1848, and purchased this and the surrounding land in 1854. He was a man with quarrying interests, and the sharp drop away at the top of the park indicates that this was part of his original quarry.

In the 1960s the park was the site of contention between local residents and Box Hill Council, which had sought to use the open space for alternate uses such as a scout hall and car park. The residents raised funds and lobbied  Council to retain the park as open space. As a result the park is still there for the pleasure of both the local residents and the Whitehorse community.

Contact the Advisory Committee